pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “Masochistic Instrument”, 1934
All his life, Dali suggested he was impotent, that his greatest pleasure of the sexual kind was gained from voyeurism and masturbation. Here the “instrument” – a violin metaphor for erectile dysfunction, or at least performance anxiety – is limp and useless, and almost takes on the appearance of a face in distress. The naked woman, who we see as if we’re peeping into the neighbor’s bedroom window, holds the soft object guardedly, as if not wanting to touch much of it, if she can help it.
Contrast the left section of the canvas with phallic images of virility at right: the tall, proud and erect cypress tree, and the rigid, pink-tipped appendage emerging from it. Dali’s preoccupation with his own sexual identity, his own desires and fears within the sexual realm, seem clearly symbolized in this surrealist picture signed in deflowering red. <source>

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “Masochistic Instrument”, 1934

All his life, Dali suggested he was impotent, that his greatest pleasure of the sexual kind was gained from voyeurism and masturbation. Here the “instrument” – a violin metaphor for erectile dysfunction, or at least performance anxiety – is limp and useless, and almost takes on the appearance of a face in distress. The naked woman, who we see as if we’re peeping into the neighbor’s bedroom window, holds the soft object guardedly, as if not wanting to touch much of it, if she can help it.

Contrast the left section of the canvas with phallic images of virility at right: the tall, proud and erect cypress tree, and the rigid, pink-tipped appendage emerging from it. Dali’s preoccupation with his own sexual identity, his own desires and fears within the sexual realm, seem clearly symbolized in this surrealist picture signed in deflowering red. <source>

surrealism:

Mad Tristan by Salvador Dalí, c. 1939. Oil on canvas.

surrealism:

Mad Tristan by Salvador Dalí, c. 1939. Oil on canvas.

(Source: bound420)

(Source: dayumbebe)

(Source: superphazed)

reality-pill:

A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space.

“Flowers aren’t just beautiful to show on tables,” said Azuma Makoto, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo. His latest installation piece, if you could call it that, takes this statement to the extreme. Two botanical objects — “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, among other blossoms — were launched into the stratosphere on Tuesday in Black Rock Desert outside Gerlach, Nevada, a site made famous for its hosting of the annual Burning Man festival. ”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Makoto explained that morning.

 

 

(Source: blazepress)